Our blog page is updated on a bi-weekly basis and covers a broad range of industry-related topics such as nuclear energy, application stories, new product highlights, replacement model updates, among many others. Here you can gleam an insight into what we’re thinking, where we’re heading, and how we’re getting there, by checking out our blogs. Want to see a topic of your interest explored? Send us a email in our contact us page!

Russian Nuclear Incident Reveals Small Modular Reactor

There’s an old adage we’re all familiar with: Those who do not learn from history, are doomed to repeat it. Well, six months shy of twenty years into this new millennium, and “Those” can apparently be substituted for the Russian government when it comes to nuclear technology. By now anyone with a cell phone or eyes to read a newspaper knows about the failed nuclear test in Sarov, a closed Russian city near the White Sea. Sarov is one of Russia’s many test cities—a entire walled-off encampment in which the Russian state nuclear agency Rosatom, frequently conducts nuclear activities that quickly fall under the shadow of one of the world’s least transparent governments. Unsurprisingly, little information has come forth in the nearly two weeks since the incident—including a death toll that was rescinded and then republished beneath a tidal wave of international skepticism.

            While we know very little about what actually occurred—rumors have abounded of visible explosions in the dead of night, radiation spikes on the screens of global nuclear watch dog organizations, runs on iodine in surrounding towns (iodine is believed to lessen the thyroid gland’s ability to absorb radiation), a fleet of gas masks being shipped in on carefully concealed trucks bearing governmental seals, and most unnerving, the allusion of the whole affair to the nefarious and shadow-like Skyfall missile project—a cruise missile with unlimited range courtesy of a nuclear engine. The Russian government has naturally denied everything, insisting the incident was a scientific experiment that failed. Eerily enough, this was nearly verbatim to their Chernobyl response until it became impossible to conceal the abhorrent truth any longer. We’re hoping that this time, that moment for the world doesn’t come when the sky actually is falling—and a warhead at its arrow-point.

            One thing we do know for certain is that the incident, whatever it was, involved the use of a small modular nuclear reactor. As a digital instrumentation manufacturer with forty-five years of melding our technology to progressive applications, and most recently within the nuclear industry, Otek is keenly interested in SMR’s. Even for, at its very base level, the enormous technological potentialities these compact little marvels may hold for our future.

            Small modular reactors (SMRs) are defined as nuclear reactors generally 300MWe equivalent or less, designed with modular technology using module factory fabrication, pursuing economies of series production and short construction times. In our era of politically-enflamed tensions at the very word nuclear, and especially when common complaints of plant costs and building time arise at every turn or regulatory meeting, the miniscule presence, self-efficiency, and fluid construction planning of these SMR’s would fill a much needed void within the industry.

            In the western world, and driven primarily by private companies, SMR’s are part of a new wave of technological progression falling across the nuclear industry. As a Class 1E Appendix B company, Otek has engineered our patented instrumentation to meet the rising challenge of analog obsolescence—our Plug & Play ideology means that, using our two most popular meters the NTM and SSAM, we replace obsolete analog technology one by one or all at once using the same wiring and operators you’ve always worked with, all with the ease of unplugging the past and plugging in Otek.

            We can’t speak for Mr. Putin and whatever clandestine proliferations he’s playing with in the dark—but we can speak for our effort to get the American nuclear industry back to preeminence within this country and beyond.

            Interested in how we’re doing that? Feel free to give us a call at 520-748-7900 or send our sales team an email at sales@otekcorp.com

             At the end of next month a long shadow will withdraw from the American landscape. A hundred miles west of Philadelphia along the banks of the Susquehanna River, the dark and silent silos of Three Mile Island’s Unit 2 reactor hang lifeless and gray in the Quaker wind. Shut down since the infamous near-disaster of 1979, Unit 2 has been nothing more than a dark landmark, a quiet reminder, a mausoleum for the American nuclear industry for the last four decades. But just across the drab-looking complex sits its twin, reactor Unit 1, faithfully serving as the region’s power backbone for the last forty-five years undaunted and unmarred by incident. Both reactors as well as the station as a whole will close forever as Fall begins to trickle across America this year.

            We know the story well—the pump failure, the inability to cool the rising reactor, a faulty valve allowing critical coolant to escape, the fuel’s eventually inferno and resulting meltdown; the hysteria, speculation, and political wrangling which followed has largely shaped the American conscience when it comes to weighing nuclear energy. Now flash forward to our present political, societal, and cultural miasma in which the fate of nuclear energy is vehemently lunged at from both sides of the spectrum. Where does the legacy of Three Mile Island fall now—to the forgetful shadows of collective despise or does it still, somewhere beneath all the misappropriations and colloquial revisionist history, offer a redemptive lesson?

            The answer, as it usually does in the human perception of history, lies somewhere in the middle. It’s unavoidable that the American nuclear industry is in trouble—Obama-era politics and the 21st century surge of natural gas from shale, along with the dark cloud of global warming and reactive energy policies, has greatly diminished both the profitability and public perception of nuclear energy. In an era where liberals and conservatives are equally screaming for clean energy, a curious mass hallucination has prevented nuclear energy (the largest and most reliable form of non-carbon producing energy on earth) from being included in the CO2 reduction agenda. Naturally this has deepened the already malignant opinion of the industry in the public eye.

            But the industry is not going the way of silent capitulation. Emboldened by the Trump administration’s rollback of restrictive policies, the owners of several of the country’s most prominent nuclear power plants have sought help from both state and federal government in the form of subsidies, rate hikes, and most importantly, to be included in the discussion of clean energy.

            The latter initiative belies a crucial flaw in our ability as a collective populace to see beyond propaganda (it’s a well known fact that we’ve long lost the ability to see with our own eyes). Despite Hollywood and leftist smear campaigns, empirical evidence provides that nuclear energy is the cleanest form currently known to man. Wind, solar, and hydro-power combined would be but a small boulder next to the mountain of energy nuclear can produce. And it’s consistent—the sun can disappear forever, the wind can die in the air, the lakes can evaporate and nuclear energy misses not one beat.

            The technology within the industry is changing as well. After decades and decades of analog instrumentation, the notoriously slow power plants are making the transition to digital technology. With a galaxy of analog instruments populating their control rooms, the conversation to digital technology will not be an easy one. Luckily, Otek has stepped up to the challenge of help reinvigorate the industry with our award-winning technology. Our New Technology Meters (NTM) and our Solid State Analog Meter (SSAM) were specifically designed with analog obsolescence and cyber security in mind—and was also the driving force in why we pushed to become a Class 1E company. The NTM models use cutting edge technology and comply with NEI 08-09 cyber security mandates; the SSAM classifies as cyber security exempt by the grace of being designed without any critical digital components such as microprocessors. A large part of the digital transition comprises financial considerations and Otek has molded its technology to address those and other challenges facing the nuclear industry.

            So as we wave goodbye to Three Mile Island let us not forget that even though its shadow may be long, its edges are wreathed with light.

            For more information on Otek’s commitment to the nuclear industry or its vast catalog of products, please call our office at (520) 748-7900 or email our sales team: sales@otekcorp.com

Otek at ISA Energy & Water Automation 2019 Conference

Among the lush emerald fairways and the heated palms, the Florida sun and summer’s end, Otek President & CEO Dr. Otto Fest is presenting his solution to analog obsolescence at the 2019 ISA Energy & Water Automation Conference. Under the stage lights of the Omni Orlando Resort, Dr. Fest will lecture on several key tenets of his published white paper Obsolescence: Another Challenge For The I & C Rooms To Overcome. His goal, and the driving force behind Otek’s new generation of technologically advanced digital panel meters, remains ever consistent: to help ease the transition away from obsolete analogs across a wide swath of industries.

            The presentation itself addresses the means of doing so from several angles. Ever mindful of Henry Ford’s problem when introducing the Model T without any natural means of comparison, Dr. Fests couches his New Technology Meters inside an examination of the identifiable options currently available to nuclear I&C rooms as they explore the conversion to digitalization.

            He identifies four prominent options:

  1. Do Nothing: New Class 1E digital replacements are simply too expensive to justify the operating expense of the manufacturer. Even rebuilt replacements can cost upwards of $20,000 each with lead times of six months or more.
  2. APC & Touch Screen Monitors: Digitizing the control room in this fashion requires 3-5 years of implementation (after several years of NRC approval processes) and may cost over $100 million in overall expenses.
  3. DAS & Touch Screen Monitors: This offers control rooms a cost-effective and quicker R.O.I. but still requires a new control room and incurs lengthy shut down expenses even after NRC approval
  4. 100% Form, Fit, and Function Replacements

            The latter is what led to the development of our New Technology Meters (NTM) and our Solid State Analog Meter (SSAM). Both meters incorporate our award-winning and patented technology, adhere to signal, loop, or external power considerations, and are designed with NEI 08-09 cyber security mandates in mind. In that regard, the NTM line functions as cyber security compliant within the 10CFR50 APP. B & 10CFR21 mandated guidelines—the SSAM’s unique marriage of analog hardware with Otek technology, notably without the inclusion of digital assets such as microprocessors, engenders this model as cyber security exempt. In fact the SSAM was designed specifically to alleviate the financial burden of NEI 08-09 by skirting cyber security expenses in aging plants and unregulated markets.

            If you were unable to attend the Orlando conference this year, Dr. Fest will be presenting at several other events scheduled for later this Fall, including ANS-Winter in Washington D.C. the first week of November.

            For more information on upcoming conferences, the NTM and SSAM, or anything else in the world of Otek, please call our office at (520) 748-7900 or contact our sales department: sales@otekcorp.com

Product Spotlight: Otek’s Universal Panel Meter (UPM)

Limitless Possibilities with New Universal Panel Meter

Tucson, Arizona– Following on the heels of Otek’s highly successful New Technology Meter (NTM) Series, the Universal Panel Meter (UPM) combines our patented technology with an influx of high functionality to create a new meter with unlimited applicational use. Incorporating the award-winning “smart” technology that powers our NTM line into an alphanumeric tri-color display that also includes counter algorithms, the UPM can function equally efficient as a Counter or as a DPM.

With this exclusive duality the UPM-L truly is universal. As a counter/timer the UPM Series (10 models) accepts over 15 digital signals, including time, event, frequency, ratio, up/down, TTL/COMS, and HV. As a DPM it readily accepts over 30 standard analog signals, including but not limited to: 100% 4-20mA loop power, from mV to 240VAC/D & 0.1, RTD, TC, S-G and many others. Additional highlights of the model feature input fail alarms with runtime stamp, self diagnostics, isolated serial I/O (USB or RS485), intensity controls, 4 relays or isolated transistors, math functions (+, -, x, √, ÷, X-Y tables, polynomials), only 100mW at 5VDC, and Ethernet/Modbus upon request. The UPM is also obsolescence hardened in conjunction with Otek’s effort to aid the transition from obsolete analogs to digital meter technology across the industrial, military, and nuclear industries.

Like all of our metering technology, the UPM Series comes equipped with the Otek lifetime warranty, which embodies our commitment to providing our customers with excellent products and service. As our motto We Do All the Work, So All You Have to Do is Plug & Play indicates, the UPM-L is highly customizable to a vast array of applications. We customize our technology to meet your needs!

The UPM-L, like all our new technology meters, measures up to the demands of the industry by providing durability and reliability. There are many models and options available in the UPM series. Learn more at www.otekcorp.com, or contact OTEK at 520-748-7900, or by email at sales@otekcorp.com.

Otek Meters in Hollywood

 

          

            Otek technology has been applied to numerous applications over the years, which has brought our meters into the secret bowels of submarines, into the cockpits of both commercial and military aircraft, into nuclear power plants and waste-water facilities, into tanks, jets, training simulators, oil rigs, farming equipment, trains, radio towers—and even, into space. Well, the Hollywood version that is.

            For all you Trekkies out there, this one’s a gem. Originally airing on December 1st, 1999, on the popular science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager in an episode entitled “Pathfinder”, protagonist Reginald Barclay is involved in an effort to communicate with the USS Voyager stranded in the Delta Quadrant. Barclay has a theory about using the MIDAS Array to create a micro wormhole in the Delta Quadrant near Voyager and use it to create a two way communication link. Barclay commands the array which as he predicted creates the wormhole into the Delta Quadrant. During this scene (31:48) an original OTEK (formally IMC) meter can be seen controlling the Tachyon Beam of the MIDAS Array.

            That’s all Trek jargon for Otek on your television at the turn of the century. The model in question (long since discontinued due to parts availability) was our 580 meter, which first went into production during the previous year, 1998. This was well-before the current illusionary circus of CGI and other magical special effects that populate the silver screen these days—so back then, when Hollywood wanted metering technology that looked professional, they called Otek.

            But our meters do much, much more than aesthetically persuade the human eye. Inside, where firmware and our award-winning technology combine to power our meters across a wide swath of industries and applications, we perform as professional as we look. In a sense, Otek meters are the exception to that beautiful cardinal rule: you can judge us by our cover.

            We also upgrade our technology as time unfolds into new options and avenues. While the 580 model was discontinued, we replaced it with technologically superior successors that have remained, twenty years later, highly successful among our customer base—these include the popular HI-Q123, HI-Q124, and HI-QTBS models respectively.

            So yea, we’ll snag a page from Star Trek on this one:

            To Boldly Go, Where No Meter Has Gone Before…

            If you would like more information on the HI-Q series or any other instrumentation in our product catalogue, including our Class 1E and cyber security compliant/exempt meters, please feel free to call our office at (520) 748-7900 or email our sales department at sales@otekcorp.com

 Otek technology has been applied to numerous applications over the years, which has brought our meters into the secret bowels of submarines, into the cockpits of both commercial and military aircraft, into nuclear power plants and waste-water facilities, into tanks, jets, training simulators, oil rigs, farming equipment, trains, radio towers—and even, into space. Well, the Hollywood version that is.

 For all you Trekkies out there, this one’s a gem. Originally airing on December 1st, 1999, on the popular science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager in an episode entitled “Pathfinder”, protagonist Reginald Barclay is involved in an effort to communicate with the USS Voyager stranded in the Delta Quadrant. Barclay has a theory about using the MIDAS Array to create a micro wormhole in the Delta Quadrant near Voyager and use it to create a two way communication link. Barclay commands the array which as he predicted creates the wormhole into the Delta Quadrant. During this scene (31:48) an original OTEK (formally IMC) meter can be seen controlling the Tachyon Beam of the MIDAS Array.

            That’s all Trek jargon for Otek on your television at the turn of the century. The model in question (long since discontinued due to parts availability) was our 580 meter, which first went into production during the previous year, 1998. This was well-before the current illusionary circus of CGI and other magical special effects that populate the silver screen these days—so back then, when Hollywood wanted metering technology that looked professional, they called Otek.

            But our meters do much, much more than aesthetically persuade the human eye. Inside, where firmware and our award-winning technology combine to power our meters across a wide swath of industries and applications, we perform as professional as we look. In a sense, Otek meters are the exception to that beautiful cardinal rule: you can judge us by our cover.

            We also upgrade our technology as time unfolds into new options and avenues. While the 580 model was discontinued, we replaced it with technologically superior successors that have remained, twenty years later, highly successful among our customer base—these include the popular HI-Q123, HI-Q124, and HI-QTBS models respectively.

            So yea, we’ll snag a page from Star Trek on this one:

            To Boldly Go, Where No Meter Has Gone Before…

            If you would like more information on the HI-Q series or any other instrumentation in our product catalogue, including our Class 1E and cyber security compliant/exempt meters, please feel free to call our office at (520) 748-7900 or email our sales department at sales@otekcorp.com

Nuclear Energy Sets Sail in Russia

   A nuclear power plant is churning through the dark cold waters of the Arctic. Bound for Russia’s Far East port city of Pevek, the Akademik Lomonosov is the first of its kind anywhere on planet Earth. Commissioned by Rosatom, the Russian State Nuclear Energy Corporation in 2007 and strapped with twin KLT-40 naval propulsion reactors in 2009, the floating nuclear power plant received its first payload of nuclear fuel in May of last year. Recently announcing it has received the required operating license to begin supplying power to Chaun municipality, Rosatom’s Akademik Lomonosov is now clear to pioneer the future of nuclear power generation through 2029, with a potential for a 40 year life extension.

            With all that entails a nuclear power plant dancing on the surface of the ocean, a nuclear cathedral would be a more apt description. The Akademik Lomonosov extends to a length of 472 feet and carries a hefty width of 98 feet, in addition to a displacement of 21,500 metric tons. Its twin reactors combine to produce up to 70MW of electricity or 300MW of heat, which the Russian agency claims will be dispersed throughout the sparsely-populated and geographically isolated Chukotka region—and that’s the real trailblazing appeal of the Akademik Lomonosov: a nuclear power plant mobile enough to offer energy to remote and desolate population who otherwise would struggle to obtain a standard of living electricity, heat, etc.

            The question is, and given the country, a highly warranted question at that, how safe is a nuclear power plant that rests upon the ocean? Naturally an enormous eruption of criticism has rained down from nearly every environmental group alive—they oppose traditional plants built on bedrock and secured on land, one can imagine their minds scrambling at the notion of nuclear power on the high seas—with prominent organizations such as Greenpeace and the Bellona Foundation throwing around phrases like “Chernobyl on ice” and “a nuclear Titanic”. Even the design calls back old Chernobyl questions due to Russia’s continued refusal to house their nuclear reactors within a containment dome. The Akademik Lomonosov has no such dome, and instead features the box-like structure the world horrifically remembers looming over the disaster in Chernobyl.

            Questions, safety concerns, right or wrong aside, this ship has sailed. A nuclear reactor now roams the ocean—and other countries are noticing. China already has plans to construct a vessel of their own as soon as 2020. Will America follow suit? Has a new future been opened up in the global nuclear industry? The answer, is blowing in the water…

            Whatever the future unfolds as, process and control will be a part of it. That’s why Otek became a Class 1E manufacturer of commercial and safety-related DPM’s such as our New Technology Series and our Cyber Security Exempt SSAM (designed without any digital components such as microprocessors) to help usher in the future of nuclear energy. Otek’s commitment to the nuclear industry affirms our long-standing believe in staying in technological step with the future.

            For more information on our products or our nuclear efforts please call 520-748-7900 or email our sales department at sales@otekcorp.com.

U.K. Business Leaders Rally Around Nuclear

 

The tangled blight of nuclear energy and carbon emissions is not only an American inferno—the United Kingdom feels the flames as well, albeit with much less of the jejune hysterical political self-possession. Their citizens, their communities and their ideologies seem much less blinded from scientific truth and common sense than their sniveling American counterpoints who take to twitter in the evaporation of second to protest everything from nuclear energy to lavatory signs and the color of the sky. Hence we see the Confederation of British Industry, the CBI, in a letter to the U.K. business secretary Greg Clark, clearly and without reservation outlining how an important a role nuclear energy must play in the country’s attempt at zero carbon emissions.

            The U.K. nuclear program has notoriously sagged in recent years, falling well behind neighbor and world-nuclear pioneer France. Recent criticism has come from the Hinkley Point C nuclear plant which has accumulated enormous production costs in an effort to power 7% of the U.K’s electricity output by 2025. The CBI is comprised of industry leaders across the United Kingdom from various corners and avenues of power generation, water treatment, electricity, etc—and what’s striking is that all of those numerous and moving parts have aligned together to produce one message: we will never meet our carbon goals without nuclear energy. The confederation said prioritizing both large-scale and the newer small module reactors would lead to huge strides and advantages, including the investment of foreign capital across the U.K. The CBI’s chief economist Rain Newton-Smith labels the nuclear initiative as “mission critical”. If only America could rally behind science, common sense, and unified purpose.

            So until that long-distant future in which America awakens from its bickering slumber and bows beneath common sense, Otek will keep pushing its award-winning and patented technology in instrumentation and process control forward. As a Class 1E company we’ve recently designed a new DPM designed to replace obsolescence-riddled ammeters in nuclear I&C rooms without incurring the costly parameters of the NEI 08-09 cyber security mandate. Our Solid State Analog Meter (SSAM) was designed without any digital assets such as microprocessors, and uses only CMOS logic which allows the meter to operate with a Cyber Security Exempt status. Currently, the SSAM is starting to generate a mounting buzz within the American nuclear industry.

            Want more information on the SSAM or any of our other technologically advanced and application-driven customizable meters? Please give us a call at 520-748-7900 or email our sales office at sales@otekcorp.com.

The Cyber Security Lesson of Riviera Beach

East of Miami, under the tropical liquid heat and along the smooth white sands nestled into the Atlantic, the small city of Riviera Beach waits idly inside a digital paralysis. The looming threat of cyber security attacks dropped through golden air and punctuated the city’s computer systems. In the stalled doldrums of the last three weeks, employees of the city have waded through a frustrating tapestry of locked emails, inaccessible bank accounts, blocked call logs and records, just to name a few. Local emergency dispatchers are unable to record 911 calls and even the police have had to issue paper citations and keep their records by hand. In essence, the governmental functions of Riviera Beach have been suspended until they agree to pay a $600, 000 ransom to faceless and virtually untraceable computer hackers.

            With little choice, city officials agreed to pay the ransom this week, using the hackers’ preferred payment in bit coins. The coastal Florida city isn’t alone—last year major cyber attacks fell upon Atlanta, Newark, and Baltimore, the latter of which is still struggling to bring their services back online after refusing to pay the ransom. The truth is that cyber attacks are becoming an increasingly prevalent side effect of the rabid digital world we have grown into as a species. With the all-encompassing rise of technology, with the connective wires roaming the planet in spades, also come the bullet holes by which cyber criminals can easily slip through. The plight of Riviera Beach could easily by the plight of a major corporation, a network of hospitals, or worse, a nuclear power plant.

            In that regard Otek has stepped up to the plate. We recently launched our brand new Solid State Analog Meter, colloquially known as the SSAM, that incorporates our award-winning patented technology with analog hardware to create a digital meter that can empirically be classified as a Cyber Security Exempt DPM. The secret lies in the meter’s construction—we designed it without any critical digital assets such as microprocessors, and using only good old fashioned CMOS logic. It functions like an advanced DPM, and does so without the potentially comprising parts cyber hackers love to pounce on. Going beyond even the security the SSAM offers, it also can play a major role in reducing the cyber security compliance costs NPP’s brush up against under the provisions of NEI 08-09. The SSAM also features a 4 ½ digit display, H.V. isolated alarm outputs, a post mortem signal fail alarm, and is covered by our lifetime warranty among many other exclusive features.

            With the world moving ever further under the digital cloud, it is imperative that we are proactive in guarding against cyber security threats. The lesson of Riviera Beach as proven what a reactive approach engenders.

            For more information on the SSAM or any of our other vast array of products please call our office at 520-748-7900 or email our sales office at sales@otekcorp.com

Instrumentation Global Market Released

       

Fior Markets has released a global market study report entitled Global Process Instrumentation Market 2018 by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2023, which predicts exponential growth for the process instrumentation market over the next five years. Several key players that are expected to shape and drive this growth are analyzed, including ABB Ltd, Rockwell Automation, Schneider Electric, Siemens, Mitsubishi Electric, Honeywell International, and Yokogawa amidst a litany of others.

            The study takes a global approach, examining past market trends and their indicative futures along the key regions of North and Latin America, Africa, Europe, the Asiatic-Pacific area, and the Middle East. Competition among and within these regions has been extensively analyzed within the report. This inter-market competition is segmented into key areas, many of which overlap to show transparency, to underscore the dynamism and inclusive potential of the global market. Segmentation categories include: field instruments, control valves, analyzers (instrumentation type), and by Oil & Gas, Chemical & Pharmacy, Paper/Pulp, Water & Water Treatment, and of course, Power (application types).

            The study also poses several leading questions designed to make sense of the aforementioned data stream:

  • What are the influencing factors for the growth of the global market?
  • What are the major drivers and restraints of this market?
  • Which regions are most demanding in terms of production and consumption?
  • What are the key outcomes of industry analysis techniques?

            Overall the study predicts a progressive expansion of the instrumentation market over the next five years, mainly due to a diversified global economy, the increasing demand for greater and more efficient energy (which in turn drives up the need for precise measurement and control instrumentation), and the ineluctable rise of technology.

            As a recognized leader within the instrumentation industry, Otek prides itself on being part of this expected growth over the next five years. Our award-winning and patented technology continues to drive our commitment to innovation, precision, efficiency, and reliability every day. Our digital panel meters are enhanced with ultra-bright, pure white LED displays that nullifies the old parallax, inefficiency, and stuck needle syndrome of obsolete ammeters, and even replaces them form, fit, and function, using the same panels and wiring in most applications. Recently, we even became a Class 1E company because we believe our highly customizable and technologically advanced meters have enormous potential to help the nuclear industry.

             Otek is always looking toward tomorrow, with the lessons of the past firmly in hand.

            Give us a call at (520)748-7900 for more information on our products or email our sales department for a quote at sales@otekcorp.com.

            A sample copy of the Fior Market study may be obtained here: https://www.fiormarkets.com/report-detail/332965/request-sample

Nuclear Energy Conference Addresses Global Concerns in London

Earlier this week delegates and industry leaders from around the world gathered in London to hold court on the current state of nuclear industry. Billed as The Nuclear New Build 2019 Conference, the two day event broached several key topics affecting today’s nuclear energy, as well as influencing its directional future.

            A brief overview:

  • Tim Stone opened the conference comparing the benefits of nuclear energy against their often perceived rivals, renewables such as solar and wind. He recalled a recent International Energy Agency report warning that decreased global nuclear power would empirically contribute to rising carbon emissions. He also joined with German-based Volkswagen decrying the German withdraw from nuclear energy and the disastrous effect it has had on the country’s energy expenses.
  • EDF Energy managing director Humphrey Cadout-Hudson discussed the feasibility of diminishing nuclear plant construction costs by copying previous plant designs, as well as the massive potential of the new advanced and small modular (AMRS & SMRS) reactors in terms of both energy output and financial costs. These new age modular reactors became a continuous topic of interest throughout the conference.
  • Nuclear Industry Council CEO David Blee continued the modular reactor talk in terms of the global market, noting, “AMR and SMRs are game changers that could lead to a “renaissance” in the supply chain.” The discussion continued over AMR’s and SMR’s as they pertain to individual countries’ nuclear energy output, at which the U.S.’s is expected to fall from 19% to 12% by 2050 unless modular reactors and policy changes are introduced.
  • The conference concluded with a definitive commitment to global net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Skepticism remains prevalent unless governmental policies in key countries, such as the U.S. & Germany, are radically altered.

            While Otek did not attend the conference, our President and Owner Dr. Otto Fest is currently presenting a timely paper on nuclear I&C room’s efforts to digitize, and the economical feasibility of doing so. We have long supported the nuclear industry with a specialized line of DPMs that are uniquely designed to replace obsolete ammeters with Form, Fit, and Function technology, as well as adhere to NEI cyber security mandates.

            For more information on our pledge to the nuclear industry or any of our products, please give us a call at 520-748-7900 or email our sales department at sales@otekcorp.com.